The Random Comic Strip

The Random Comic Strip

Words to live by...

"How beautiful it is to do nothing, and to rest afterward."

[Spanish Proverb]

Ius luxuriae publice datum est

(The right to looseness has been officially given)

"Everyone carries a part of society on his shoulders," wrote Ludwig von Mises, "no one is relieved of his share of responsibility by others. And no one can find a safe way for himself if society is sweeping towards destruction. Therefore everyone, in his own interest, must thrust himself vigorously into the intellectual battle."

Apparently, the crossword puzzle that disappeared from the blog, came back.


Monday, April 6, 2009

A Thought for These Times

Today, any day really, is a good day to read this poem. At a time when life seems full of stress and worry. When the world seems at its craziest. When we think it's important to worry about the future or the events far away and out of our control. When we think the nation will fall, that the barbarians are at the gate, that the planet is fragile and about to be destroyed by man. Then it is an especially good day to read a poem like this, sit back, and find your center.

Desiderata

-- written by Max Ehrmann in the 1920s --

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible, without surrender,
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even to the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.
Avoid loud and aggressive persons;
they are vexatious to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain or bitter,
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs,
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals,
and everywhere life is full of heroism.
Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love,
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment,
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.
You are a child of the universe
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be.
And whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life,
keep peace in your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.


Also see...
The Confused History of "Desiderata"


And, now, I am off to play golf.

[960/961/830]

7 comments:

Neo said...

have a great day

Sweet Cheeks said...

"Many fears are born of fatigue and lonliness..."

Douglas, this is so true. I have a friend who is experiencing despair...from lack of love and self confidence. I will send this poem to him. And thank you for reafirming that there is good will in the world.

Happy Day to you Sweetie!
:)

Brenda Bowers said...

Doug, I do enjoy your comments on Log's site, and your laid back and warm site here. I wish I could go into retirement as easily as you and my husband have. I still feel guilty if I spend too much time just sitting and enjoying my flower garden during the day. I feel I must be doing something and even looking at the flowers I chide myself that I could be trimming the dead blossoms out.

The same applies with blogging. When I started in '05 Lew and I had just retired here to Greensboro, NC after spending eleven years as full time RVer's so I planned for my blog to be the thousand and one stories from my "Travels with Lew" journal. Didn't last long! I jumped head first into the middle of local politics which then expanded to National and International politics.

I do wish some days that I could just give up and leave it to the young and just go smell my flowers and quilt my quilt and paint a pretty picture. How does one change after almost 50 years of activism? How does one stop being concerned about what is happening in the world that one's grandchildren is inheriting? BB

Douglas said...

Neo - I promptly went out and made myself miserable toward the end of the game. This happens frequently. I need to keep the thoughts that poem evokes in my mind throughout a round. Or break all my clubs, one or the other.

Sweet Cheeks - The poem is pretty old. I ran into it during a turbulent time, the late 60s, when I was caught up in all the social upheaval of the era. It appealed to me then and is something I think about from time to time. There are shorter ones that can lend the same feeling of peace but none say it better, I think. I hope your friend remembers he is capable of finding peace within himself soon.

Brenda - I am a lazy person. Someone once called me the "tensest lazy person" they knew. This makes it easy for me to do as little as possible. I simply do not have that urge to keep busy. Things upset me, like they do you, but I have I decided I can only be honest and encourage others to eschew emotion when it comes to politics. Even as I fail to do that myself. What you see on the Logistician's blog is why I stay away from politics on this one.

Brenda Bowers said...

Meant to tell you that Pickles is my favorite comics too. Lew and I due to the full time traveling and now being retired have spent 15 years (married 34 years) together on a 24/7 basis so there is seldom something in Pickles that we haven't experienced. LOL as they say getting old is not for whimps and it definitely requires a sense of humor! BB

Douglas said...

Brenda - There are so many good comic strips. I have so many favorites but, yeah, "Pickles" is right there at the top. Humor is much more effective, and enjoyable, when we can relate to it.

Douglas said...

Neo - I promptly went out and made myself miserable toward the end of the game. This happens frequently. I need to keep the thoughts that poem evokes in my mind throughout a round. Or break all my clubs, one or the other.

Sweet Cheeks - The poem is pretty old. I ran into it during a turbulent time, the late 60s, when I was caught up in all the social upheaval of the era. It appealed to me then and is something I think about from time to time. There are shorter ones that can lend the same feeling of peace but none say it better, I think. I hope your friend remembers he is capable of finding peace within himself soon.

Brenda - I am a lazy person. Someone once called me the "tensest lazy person" they knew. This makes it easy for me to do as little as possible. I simply do not have that urge to keep busy. Things upset me, like they do you, but I have I decided I can only be honest and encourage others to eschew emotion when it comes to politics. Even as I fail to do that myself. What you see on the Logistician's blog is why I stay away from politics on this one.