The Random Comic Strip

The Random Comic Strip

Words to live by...

"How beautiful it is to do nothing, and to rest afterward."

[Spanish Proverb]

Ius luxuriae publice datum est

(The right to looseness has been officially given)

"Everyone carries a part of society on his shoulders," wrote Ludwig von Mises, "no one is relieved of his share of responsibility by others. And no one can find a safe way for himself if society is sweeping towards destruction. Therefore everyone, in his own interest, must thrust himself vigorously into the intellectual battle."

Apparently, the crossword puzzle that disappeared from the blog, came back.


Monday, February 2, 2009

My, How We Change...

I've been melancholy the past few days, we'll blame that on the flu. I should be blue today, too, since it's a rainy day and I didn't get to play golf. But I'm over the flu and feeling quite chipper.
Still, a rainy day is a good one to look back over one's past. Something that I have been meaning to do.

I have been going over some old photos. Every time I do I recall an song from 1968, or thereabouts, where some old people are talking about memories and lamenting not having photos of the events or people. It might have been a Chad and Jeremy song, or maybe Simon and Garfunkel, I don't recall.

In any event, as I looked through the pictures, I realized how much I changed over the years. We all do, of course. Nothing special about that. There aren't a lot of pictures of me around. My family was never one for albums. Which means that I didn't either. Most of the pictures I took I just passed on to my mother. I don't even have any school yearbooks to look over. Though I do have a couple of Cruise books from when I was in the Navy.

Anyway, I thought I would list a few pictures and let you see my metamorphosis from a boy to an old man. Part II tomorrow.

6 comments:

Michael said...

Handsome as a teenager, Douglas.

I have a lot of photographs of me. One, my mother got custody of me. Two, my mother is Asian. Three, our Asian family is close, and stretches far. I have a lot, a lot, a lot of pictures of me.

I guess I won't know how to appreciate them until I grow up.

Michael.

P.S. By the way, if I do go to Canada for university, I decided I might take a trip down to the US and travel a bit in the next year or so, to see sights, to meet people and to experience an all-American road trip. Whether I do that or not, I would love to visit Florida and have you take me out for some golf. I love the sport, but don't have my own equipment, or the time, but I'm interested in getting more practice. What do you think?

The Logistician said...

Always been fascinated about how people look toward their past. I've never had any interest in genealogy or my family tree, never owned a camera, and never had a desire to take photos. I've always felt that I would miss something in the present fumbling with the equipment and settings. I have a few photos, but never look at them. Apparently, during a fire or natural disaster, people often run to grab their pets and photos. Fascinating. It's always been about where do I go from here, for me.

Douglas said...

Lg - Even though I had an interest in photography, I failed to take a lot of pictures of my son growing up (though I have a few). Keeping albums was not important. Now, there's this little nagging voice telling me I should have.

Michael - Take the pictures. Put notations on them (where, when, who). Pass them to your mother. She'll hang on to them and then you will reap the benefits later when you do come to appreciate them.
Yes, make plans to do that. I'll be here. If I stop blogging (or you do), keep in touch via email.Get what practice you can, play when you get a chance. Even just hitting balls at a range with a rented or borrowed club is helpful at your age. Maintain the hand-eye coordination.

Douglas said...

Nobody asked but the other people in the photos are my uncle Ronnie, my son Brian (at age 2), my sister, my father, and my mother.

I was all of 12 or 13 in that 2nd photo.

Douglas said...

Nobody asked but the other people in the photos are my uncle Ronnie, my son Brian (at age 2), my sister, my father, and my mother.

I was all of 12 or 13 in that 2nd photo.

Douglas said...

Lg - Even though I had an interest in photography, I failed to take a lot of pictures of my son growing up (though I have a few). Keeping albums was not important. Now, there's this little nagging voice telling me I should have.

Michael - Take the pictures. Put notations on them (where, when, who). Pass them to your mother. She'll hang on to them and then you will reap the benefits later when you do come to appreciate them.
Yes, make plans to do that. I'll be here. If I stop blogging (or you do), keep in touch via email.Get what practice you can, play when you get a chance. Even just hitting balls at a range with a rented or borrowed club is helpful at your age. Maintain the hand-eye coordination.