The Random Comic Strip

The Random Comic Strip

Words to live by...

"How beautiful it is to do nothing, and to rest afterward."

[Spanish Proverb]

Ius luxuriae publice datum est

(The right to looseness has been officially given)

"Everyone carries a part of society on his shoulders," wrote Ludwig von Mises, "no one is relieved of his share of responsibility by others. And no one can find a safe way for himself if society is sweeping towards destruction. Therefore everyone, in his own interest, must thrust himself vigorously into the intellectual battle."

Apparently, the crossword puzzle that disappeared from the blog, came back.


Monday, November 3, 2008

Writer's Block

Every so often I get writer's block. Like just now. Or any time I open a word processor.I may have a great idea or two floating around my brain but the moment I see that blank screen, my mind imitates it.The creative process is a tease. She entices you, gives you a glimspe of a well turned phrase, the allure of a smooth flow of words, and the promise of a satisfying final result. And then she leaves you for some hack at a tabloid whose specialty is alien abductions.

It's amazing any of us can write anything. We start out on Dick and Jane books, move up to comic books, muddle our way through Dickens and Eliot, and maybe, if we are lucky, discover there is something worth reading, something that grabs our hearts and makes us fall in love with the written word. Of the small number who make it to that level, a fraction succumb to the notion that they could actually write something worth reading. That belief probably starts soon after we learn to put a sentence together, however poorly, and are praised for it by someone we love and/or admire. Like that first grade teacher who smelled so good, smiled so nicely at you, and stirred feelings you didn't understand until puberty struck. A few kind words about an unevenly scribbled paper full of misspellings and grammatical errors poorly explaining a book you struggled to get through sets you on a course of pain, frustration, rejection, compliments, joy, and rare insights into your own soul.

That's why we write, isn't it? To drill down into our psyches and battle the horrors and fears we believe are there. Or maybe to make the beauty we see outside ourselves a part of us. Because as much as we might deny it, it is about our own egos. It is said that a writer's first novel is autobiographical in nature, regadless of the actual subject. Some might say the writer puts a piece of himself in every character he creates. It's probably true. After all, who else do we know so much, and so little, about? But above all, we have stories to tell, stories that we want to tell.

Unless writer's block strikes.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

I get a lot of ideas floating around in my head, but then, when I seat myself in front of the computer, somehow, all the ideas seem to disappears. I was thinking maybe I should record them down verbally when they comes up, but probably, I will not be able to string them up into proper sentences also. I guess I just don't have the gift, like some would say. I am only imagining that somebody out there would find what I write interesting.

Michael said...

Very thoughtful. I try very hard not to let myself succumb to writer's block when it comes to my blog, my television reviews and my homework.

I've tried writing a novel or two. It's true. I certainly did put A LOT of myself in my characters. It's a shame that writer's block has stopped me from writing more than the first chapter.

And I am studying Eliot for school. I am writing a 4000-word essay on the depictions of Hell in Homer's Odyssey, Dante's Inferno and a selection of T.S. Eliot poems. Eliot is tough.

I appreciate your blog. Following it.

Michael.
http://doyouhateittoo.blogspot.com/

Douglas said...

To anonymous: It is only important that you be interested in what you write. If you are then others will also be. Each writer's style is different because it comes from within himself, each is therefore valuable.

Douglas said...

I find all poets tough. That is probably because I have no rhythm and stutter on rhymes. Slog through, try to read it for pleasure's sake, in the end it will be worth it. We absorb knowledge and understanding but not easily. It comes best when we do not try too hard to learn, I think.

Small Footprints said...

I've never thought about it in that way but ... you're right ... writing is all about ego. Whether we are trying to understand our own inner workings or trying to contain the beauty we see ... it's still all about us. I have to say, though, that whatever ... or whomever ... is responsible for giving you the idea that you could write ... well, we should thank them. You have a wonderful ability to convert your thoughts to words.

Isn't it funny about ideas and writer's block? I get these marvelous ideas in the shower or as I'm falling asleep and then ... sitting at the keyboard ... that great, Pulitzer prize winning article vanishes into thin air.

Take care!

Small Footprints
http://reducefootprints.blogspot.com

The Logisitician said...

Thanks much Douglas for paying a visit to our blog and leaving such an insightful comment and the compliment.

I'm not particularly creative. Additionally, although I generated paper extensively for almost 30 years in my profession, I rarely wrote anything else prior to April of this year, when I started my blog. Much to my surprise, I've cranked out a massive amount of "stuff."

What I have discovered is that if I plan an article, or write down an outline, the article will not get written. If I think about something too much in depth, it will not get written. I'm at my most fluid and best when all of a sudden I get the urge to get up and sit at the computer and just let it flow. But that's just me. Everyone has to find their own style.

I look forward to you visiting our site often. Consider becoming a Guest Author should you so desire. Simply check out Post No. 34 for the guidelines. Thanks for the engagement.

The Logisitician said...

Thanks again for your numerous comments on our "the view from outside my tiny window" blog. We very much appreciate it.

If you will glance down toward the bottom of the light green column on the right side of the blog, in the area which does not change with the posts, you will find two methods to become a follower of our blog.

Thanks for becoming a follower. We need more folks like you.

The Logisitician said...

You're keeping us on our toes over at the Institute for Applied Common Sense Douglas. We like that. Keep at it. Thanks.

Ares said...

i'm afraid i don't have any profound thought to share but i do appreciate this particular article. specially now that i'm trying my hardest to finish this story i am currently working on.. well, actually it's supposed to be a novel, but it would be a shame if i won't be able to make it one due to writer's block.. so i'll continue using the term "story" until it becomes a full pledged novel.

btw, following. :)

Ares
http://www.cloudsandletters.blogspot.com
http://www.potofemotions.blogspot.com

The Logisitician said...

Thanks much Douglas for paying a visit to our blog and leaving such an insightful comment and the compliment.

I'm not particularly creative. Additionally, although I generated paper extensively for almost 30 years in my profession, I rarely wrote anything else prior to April of this year, when I started my blog. Much to my surprise, I've cranked out a massive amount of "stuff."

What I have discovered is that if I plan an article, or write down an outline, the article will not get written. If I think about something too much in depth, it will not get written. I'm at my most fluid and best when all of a sudden I get the urge to get up and sit at the computer and just let it flow. But that's just me. Everyone has to find their own style.

I look forward to you visiting our site often. Consider becoming a Guest Author should you so desire. Simply check out Post No. 34 for the guidelines. Thanks for the engagement.

Douglas said...

To anonymous: It is only important that you be interested in what you write. If you are then others will also be. Each writer's style is different because it comes from within himself, each is therefore valuable.